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Book or Movie? What Should We Do First?

by Miriam Downey 30. July 2014 07:40

 

 What do you like to do first--read the book or see the movie? My grandchildren and I had an interesting discussion about this dilemma around the breakfast table the other day. I was asking specifically about the movie The Fault in Our Stars, which my 13-year-old granddaughters had just seen. I have this book by John Green sitting on my desk, waiting for an afternoon so I can read it before I watch the movie. I asked the girls if they would like to read the book now that they had seen the movie. Thus the conversation. The girls had loved the movie so much that they both wanted to read the book.

My 17-year-old grandson piped up and said that he liked to read books after he had seen the movie. He said that when he read the Hunger Games books, he had the vision of the characters from the movie in his mind. He was quick to add that he had loved the Percy Jackson books so much that the movie didn't compare to the images he had in his mind. So, as we discussed the issue, what emerged was the idea that it can go both ways--sometimes the book is better; sometimes the movie.

So, here's a summer challenge for you. There are a wealth of movies based on children and teen books. Today I am going to give you a list of ten book-movie pairings for elementary grade children. Next week I will give you a list of book-movie pairings for middle and high school-aged kids. Try them out both ways--movie first and then book first. See which one you like best.

I have provided a link for the book if it is available online. Of course, the books will all be available at the library, and it is likely that the movies will be available at the library as well, but they will also be available at some of your other movie sources. I also indicated the year of the movie. This is only a partial list. A more complete list of book-movie pairings can be found here.

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. (The movie is the Walt Disney version updated in 2010).

Charlotte's Web by E.B. White. (Animated version 1973 and live version 2006).

Five Children and It by E. Nesbit. (Movie is 2005).

James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl. (Disney Version, 2010).

Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg. (movie 2000).

Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfield. (movie 2008).

Holes by Louis Sacher. (movie 2003).

The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. (Disney version updated 2007).

Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers (movie updated version 2009). Also a new movie about the making of the Mary Poppins movie called Saving Mr. Banks (2013).

Mr. Popper's Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater. (movie 2011).

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls. (movie 1997).

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Blog | English

Interactive Reading

by Miriam Downey 16. July 2014 11:13

My father had one story from his childhood that he loved to tell. It was a simple story about him harnessing his horse, Topsy, to the wagon, loading the wagon with milk cans, and riding into town to the dairy with his dog, Jack. What the children loved was the interaction; they could go "clippety clop: as Topsy clattered down the road, and "bow wow wow wow" as Jack asked for a treat. Grandpa told the story many times to his grandchildren, and they even told it at his memorial service, even though they were all adults by then.

Children love interactive stories, particularly kindergarten and first graders who are just beginning to read for themselves. A new book, Born Reading, by Jason Boog, published by Touchstone just this week, has a great list of interactive story books that children love. I heartily recommend his book to you if you have young children.

Here is how to read a book interactively. Read it to the child first, then read it again having the child help you make the sounds or cry out the important words. Finally, hand the book to the child and watch him/her read it aloud even if they can't read yet.

I had this experience this week. I read No! David! by David Shannon to my granddaughter. It is an almost wordless story of a toddler who is always doing something naughty. I changed David to Davick, which is her toddler brother's name. She thought it was the funniest thing ever, because, of course, we are always saying No! to Davick. Although she is only three, she soon was reading the whole book herself, pointing to the word No! Then she wanted me to read it to her again, only this time she was the one being scolded. it was so much fun!

 Here is Boog's list of great interactive books from his book Born Reading.

Pete the Cat by Eric Litwin and James Dean. A groovy cat teaches kids how to cope with life's little problems. You can find several songs and some other activities at this website.

I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison. Lots of music on a trip to the park.

Can You Make a Scary Face by Jan Thomas. Children make funny faces to match the story. Here are some activities to do as follow-up.

From Head to Toe by Eric Carle. Children imitate and complete a series of exercises.

Press Here by Herve Tullet. Touch the pages, shake the book, and blow on the pages.

Tap the Magic Tree by Christie Matheson. This fun book has you tapping it, shaking it, jiggling it, and blowing it a kiss.

Don't Push the Button by Bill Cotter. A bit of reverse psychology.

It's a Tiger by David LaRochelle. Lots of noisy animal sounds.

Clip-Clop by Nicola Smee. A horse carries animals around the barnyard. A story you can reenact with your kids.

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems. A pesky pigeon wants to take the bus for a joyride, but your child will love to tell him to stop!

I am indebted to Jason Boog for this list of books. He has a wonderful website that is filled with lists of books and activities for children. You can access it here. The books can all be found at the library or your local bookstore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Blog | English | Libraries, Library Books

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